MOVEMBER IS TACKLING MEN’S HEALTH!

The Month of November is dedicated to Men’s Health, including Prostate Cancer, Testicular Cancer, Mental Health & Suicide Prevention.

Across the world, men die an average six years younger than women, and for reasons that are largely preventable. Which means that it doesn’t have to be that way: we can all take action to live healthier, happier and longer lives.

WE CAN’T AFFORD TO LET THIS CONTINUE.

 

TESTICULAR CANCER!

Testicular cancer is not a common cancer, but it is the most commonly diagnosed cancer after skin cancer in men aged 18–39. In most cases, the outcome for men with testicular cancer is positive. But a 95% chance of survival is no comfort to the 1 man in 20 who won’t make it.

 

FACTS!

    • TESTICULAR CANCER STRIKES YOUNG. In Australia, testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men. It occurs most often in men aged 25–40.
    • About 800 men are diagnosed with testicular cancer in Australia each year, accounting for about 1% of all cancers in men.
    • Men who have previously had cancer in one testicle are about 25 times more likely to develop cancer in the other testicle.
    • Men born with undescended testicles are still about 16 times more likely to develop testicular cancer than men born with descended testicles.
    • Family history is only a factor in a small number (about 2%) of men who are diagnosed with testicular cancer.
    • 70% OF MEN DO NOT SELF CHECK! 

 

WHAT IS TESTICULAR CANCER?

Testicles are responsible for the production of male hormones (mostly testosterone) and sperm. Testicular cancer starts as an abnormal growth or tumour that develops in one or both testicles. There are several types of testicular cancer, but the most common is the germ cell tumour.

 

SYMPTOMS!

In some men, testicular cancer does not cause any noticeable symptoms, and it may be detected during tests for other conditions. Other men may notice one or more of the following symptoms:

  • swelling or a lump in the testicle, which are both usually painless
  • a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum
  • a change in the size or shape of the testicle (e.g. hardness or swelling)
  • a feeling of unevenness between the testicles
  • aches or pain in the lower abdomen, testicle or scrotum
  • enlargement or tenderness of the breast tissue (gynaecomastia)
  • back pain
  • stomach-aches.

These symptoms don’t necessarily mean you have testicular cancer. They are common to other conditions, such as cysts, which are harmless lumps. However, if you have any of these symptoms, you should have them checked by your doctor without delay.

 

SELF CHECKING!

The best thing you can do for your testicles is give them a bit of a feel each month or so, and if something doesn’t seem right, head to the doctor.

If you’ve given your testicles a feel and noticed a lump that wasn’t there before, concerning pain or swelling – don’t panic – but get it checked out by your doctor. Many times, lumps and swellings don’t mean cancer, but it could be something else. It’s best to let a doctor get up close and personal to see what’s going on.

 

It is important that if you are experiencing anything which is not normal for you to speak to you GP.

 

For more information on Prostate Cancer click on the below links: